Photography

Digital Photography Review - News

May 27, 2018
DPReview TV: How to get correct exposure when shooting video

Have you experienced frustration when using your camera to shoot video? Confused about T-stops, ND filters and the right shutter speed to use? This week, Chris and Jordan take a break from gear reviews to discuss the things you should know to get proper exposure when shooting video. Get some practical tips and learn about Chris and Jordan's exposure square... or is that an exposure trapezoid? Tune in to find out.

You may also want to read our article, A photographer's intro to the world of video, for more useful tips.

A photographer's intro to the world of video

Finally, make sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel to get new episodes of DPReview TV every week.

Subscribe to our YouTube channel

May 26, 2018
Not your ordinary camera bag: Rhake waterproof pack with Camera Capsule insert review

The Rhake Weatherproof Bag + Camera Capsule
$365 (bag) + $130 (insert) | MissionWorkshop.com

The Rhake pack has a roll top giving it a decent degree of expansion.

The Rhake waterproof backpack by Mission Workshops doesn’t look like an ordinary camera bag – instead it looks a lot more like a high quality bike messenger pack or something you might take on a weekend trip when packing light. And that’s the point. The bag’s 22L main compartment is designed to be multi-functional. Once you slide the Capsule Camera insert ($130) into the Rhake you have a camera bag with a utilitarian design, albeit with a very high price tag.

The Capsule Camera insert that slides into the Rhake pack.

Though this pack is not designed specifically with photographers in mind, I was intrigued to find out just how functional it could be.

Specifications

  • Exterior: 21 x 13 x 5 in / 53 x 33 x 13cm
  • Interior Volume: 22L
  • Capsule Insert: 9.75 x 17.75 x 4.25in / 25 x 45 x 11cm
  • Laptop Compartment: Dedicated 17in Exterior Pocket
  • Weight: 3.1lbs / 1.4kg

Design & construction

The first thing I noticed about the Rhake was the high quality construction – Mission Design guarantees their products for life – which makes me believe that this thing was built to last. The bag is made of weatherproof nylon fabric called HT500 that is apparently exclusive to the company. It gives the pack an understated look and a good degree of water and stain resistance.

The Rhake pack's laptop compartment can fit up to a 17" computer. The pack also has a dedicated tablet compartment.

The second thing I noticed about this bag was the amount of organizational pockets. There are technically two zippered compartments that are large enough to fit a laptop (a dedicated exterior pocket, shown above left, and a second one within the 22L main compartment). On the back of the bag, opposite the exterior laptop pocket, there is a mesh water bottle pocket that tucks away when not in use.

There are numerous options for organization within this bag to suit your tastes

The front of the Rhake features a dedicated 10” tablet pocket and two accessory pouches (one at the top of the bag and one at the bottom) for stashing chargers, spare batteries or other items that need to be accessed quickly.

There are two zippered front pockets with plenty of room to organize smaller odds and ends. There are also two accessory pouches, one at the top (accessible via the roll top) - and one at the bottom (accessible via zipper).

There are also two larger zippered front pockets, one of which is filled with three smaller interior zippered mesh pockets. In short, there are numerous options for organization within this bag to suit your tastes.

The straps are well-padded and a horizontal strap offers added stability.

The back of the Rhake is made of perforated foam and there is a luggage handle pass-through for use with roller bags. The straps have a nice amount of padding and feature an additional horizontal buckled strap.

The camera insert can be accessed from the top of the bag. A look inside the Rhake pack once the camera insert has been removed.

The Camera Capsule insert is accessed from the top of the Rhake pack. The inside can be customized to your taste using the padded partitions. There’s also a back pocket in the insert where you can slide in an 11" laptop or tablet.

A close-up look inside the Camera Capsule insert. I was able to fit two bodies, several lenses and a flash.

In the field

All of my photographer friends who saw the Rhake in action immediately complimented the style of this bag. It looks good, and it can comfortably hold a large amount of gear. I loved the many organizational pockets and those tiny mesh interiors were a great place for all of my miscellaneous items that I end up with at a shoot.

Once it’s packed, the front is snapped together and the top rolled shut, the Rhake pack is a surprisingly compact gear bag with the ability to expand to hold a large amount of equipment.

Its compact silhouette made it a good for riding the subway (even during rush hour) and hauling it around didn’t make me feel like I was in danger of destroying a shoulder.

There's no way to access most of the gear stored within the Camera Capsule insert unless you completely remove it from the bag

Unfortunately, there is one glaring design flaw with the Rhake: there's no way to access most of the gear stored within the Camera Capsule insert unless you completely remove it from the bag. For some photographers, this might seem like a minor oversight; after all the Rhake is a multi-functional bag, but I found this design element to be really inconvenient. It was easy enough to access my main camera body through the top zipper, but if I wanted to switch lenses I needed to totally unpack the 22L compartment – which is kind of a pain when working in the cramped quarters of a dark music venue.

When the bag is fully packed it also takes a little bit of elbow grease to remove the Camera Capsule from the main compartment. I imagine that with more use the bag’s structure will become less tight, but on the shoots I took the Rhake to I found myself having to spend a few extra moments safely removing the capsule from the bag. The Camera Capsule essentially fills the 22L compartment, making it difficult to stash anything else in there (a jacket, supplies for an overnight trip, etc.). I’d be curious to see how the Rhake would function with smaller camera inserts like the Topo Camera Cubes.

What’s the bottom line?

The Rhake’s construction is high quality, the design is aesthetically pleasing and it can hold a good deal of gear without looking bulky, making it great for everyday use. But the bag is pricey and the multi-functionality aspects make certain elements of the design inconvenient for photographers. Ultimately, if you're looking for a dedicated camera bag, there are other more cost-friendly and functional options out there. However, if you want a pack that can pull double duty as a bike bag or a weekend travel pack, the Rhake might be for you.

What We Like:

  • Utilitarian design
  • Durable construction
  • Slim profile
  • Ample organizational pockets
  • Holds a lot of equipment
  • Multi-functional bag, could be used as a camera bag or for something else

What We Don’t Like:

  • High price tag
  • Inability to access lenses in Camera Capsule without unpacking

Rating:

May 25, 2018
Video: How Tony and Chelsea Northrup won $40,000 in image theft lawsuit

Well-known photography educators Tony and Chelsea Northrup have published a new video that details the saga of a stolen photograph, and the eventual $40,000 settlement they received as a result of going after the offending party.

The image, a portrait of Chelsea originally taken for a book cover, was used by an Australian company to promote a smartphone selfie case with built-in LEDs. According to the duo, they became aware of the unauthorized usage in 2016 after someone who recognized the image alerted them. Tony sent the company an email requesting information, he explains in the video, but instead received a letter from a lawyer hired by the company.

The lawyer's letter claimed that a graphic designer hired by the company to design the product packaging had acquired the image "from a website" and used it as a stock image without the company's knowledge. As the Northrups note, a high-resolution version of the image is the first result on Google when searching for "ring light portrait."

The company, via the lawyer's letter, had stated that it would recall all of the products with that packaging and cease use of material containing the image. However, Tony explains that the duo continued to receive images from followers showing the cases—complete with the pilfered portrait—being sold in Australian and New Zealand stores.

That ultimately set in motion a long legal tussle that involved hiring an Australian attorney willing to deal with an international copyright case. The duo explain everything that went into this process and the eventual $40,000 in settlement payments that resulted, with Tony estimating the company spent around $60k total when including fees.

May 25, 2018
Sigma announces price and ship date of 105mm F1.4 'bokeh master' Art lens

Sigma's special 'bokeh master' 105mm F1.4 DG HSM Art lens made quite a splash when it was first announced back in February, and now Sigma is finally revealing when it will ship and how much it will cost. If you're in the market for this behemoth of a lens—seriously, we got a hands on at CP+... it's huge—for either Nikon, Canon, or Sigma mounts, you'll have to pony up $1,600 USD and wait until "late June" to get it.

For Canon and Sigma shooters, this is a whole new speed of lens that you've never had access to before. For Nikon shooters, it's an opportunity to save $600 on the Nikon 105mm F1.4E ED lens, which is currently going for $2,200.

To learn more about this lens, check out our hands-on coverage from CP+, read the full pricing and availability press release below, or visit the Sigma website.

Press Release

Sigma Announces Pricing and Availability for Its 105mm F1.4 DG HSM Art Lens

The “Bokeh Master” will begin shipping in Canon, Nikon and Sigma mounts in late June for a retail price of $1,599.00 USD

Ronkonkoma, NY – May 25, 2018 – Sigma Corporation of America, a leading still photo and cinema lens, camera, flash and accessory manufacturer, today announced that its 105mm F1.4 DG HSM Art lens will be available in Canon, Nikon and Sigma camera mounts in late June for $1,599.00 USD through authorized US dealers. The Sony E-mount availability will be announced later.

The “Bokeh Master” with Longest Focal Length Among Sigma Wide-Aperture F1.4 Art Lenses

The Sigma 105mm F1.4 DG HSM Art is the ninth lens in the Sigma F1.4 line-up designed for full-frame cameras. To combine outstanding wide-aperture, mid-telephoto performance with F1.4 brightness at maximum aperture, this lens incorporates 17 optical elements in 12 groups, including three FLD glass elements, two SLD glass elements and one aspherical lens element. This optical setup minimizes axial chromatic aberration to deliver ultra high resolution along with ample peripheral light volume, which minimizes vignetting. As a result, the area in focus is extremely sharp, while the out-of-focus area features a beautiful bokeh effect with highly natural colors, making this a desired lens for portrait photography. The optical design also minimizes sagittal coma flare, making it an excellent choice for capturing starry skies.

Featuring the Sports line level dust- and splash-proof design, this lens can be used in varying weather conditions. The high-speed, high-accuracy autofocus helps photographers react in an instant to capture those special moments.

Other lens highlights include carbon fiber reinforced plastic hood for durability and compatibility of the Canon mount lens with the Canon Lens Aberration Correction function.

May 25, 2018
Nikon D5 firmware update adds useful 'recall shooting functions' feature

Nikon has released firmware version 1.30 for its D5 professional DSLR, and the new camera software offers a new feature that's potentially very useful: recall shooting functions.

The "recall shooting functions" option is now available for Custom settings f1 (custom control assignment) and can be configured so that pressing and holding specific controls will recall previously saved exposure settings (including shutter speed and aperture). The function is designed to allow for quick changes of shooting parameters in variable light conditions.

The function can be assigned to the Preview button, Fn1 button, Fn2 button, AF-ON button, Sub-selector center, AF-ON button for vertical shooting, or Lens focus function buttons. If you are using a WR-1 or WR-T10 remote control, it can also be assigned to the Fn buttons on those controls. An addendum to the camera manual that explains the new function in more detail can be downloaded on the Nikon website.

All other changes in this update are fairly minor. The focal lengths of some AF-S and AF-I lenses that are displayed with a teleconverter attached to the camera have been updated, and the time zone display in the Setup Menu only shows the names of major cities in the currently selected time zone. There are also a couple of minor bug fixes.

To read the full change log or download the new firmware for yourself, head over to the Nikon website.